188/4 E-Commerce Group
Institute of Software Technology and Interactive Systems
Vienna University of Technology
Favoritenstrasse 9-11/188, A-1040 Vienna, Austria

The Case for the Web of Needs

Authors: 
F. Kleedorfer, C. Busch, C. Pichler, C. Huemer
Publisher: 
IEEE Computer Society
Proceedings: 
Proceedings of the 16th IEEE Conference on Business Informatics (CBI 2014), Volume 1
Pages: 
94 - 101
Year: 
2014
Type: 
Proceedings contribution
Hidden Keywords: 
Department Focus: 
Business Informatics
TU Focus: 
Information and Communication Technology
ISBN: 
Abstract: 
E-marketplaces on the World Wide Web are information and transaction silos, which in the general case don't allow transactions across their boundaries. The consequence is that the Web, often termed the global marketplace, is fragmented along the dimensions of geography, content domain, supply or demand, user base, and many more. This fragmentation makes it inefficient to buy and sell commodities on the Web. We propose a framework that serves as a foundation for a distributed, de-centralized e-marketplace on top of the Web, making boundaries between existing systems disappear from the user's perspective. The framework standardizes the creation and description of objects that represent supply and demand. In addition to this, it allows for independent matching services to connect objects suitable for a transaction and it defines protocols for the message exchange between such objects.
Abstract German: 
E-marketplaces on the World Wide Web are information and transaction silos, which in the general case don't allow transactions across their boundaries. The consequence is that the Web, often termed the global marketplace, is fragmented along the dimensions of geography, content domain, supply or demand, user base, and many more. This fragmentation makes it inefficient to buy and sell commodities on the Web. We propose a framework that serves as a foundation for a distributed, de-centralized e-marketplace on top of the Web, making boundaries between existing systems disappear from the user's perspective. The framework standardizes the creation and description of objects that represent supply and demand. In addition to this, it allows for independent matching services to connect objects suitable for a transaction and it defines protocols for the message exchange between such objects.