188/4 E-Commerce Group
Institute of Software Technology and Interactive Systems
Vienna University of Technology
Favoritenstrasse 9-11/188, A-1040 Vienna, Austria

"Mine Your Own Business: Evidence-based BPM using Process Mining"

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Guest talk by Wil van der Aalst
Turning Event Data Into Valuable Insights on Performance and Compliance
Friday, 11 April 2014, 11.00-12.30, EI 9

Abstract:
Recently, process mining emerged as a new scientific discipline on the interface between process models and event data. Whereas conventional Business Process Management (BPM) approaches are mostly model-driven with little consideration for event data, the increasing availability of high-quality data enables management decisions based on “evidence” rather than PowerPoints or Visio diagrams. Process mining can be used to (better) configure BPM systems and check compliance. Moreover, the high-quality event logs of BPM systems allow for advanced forms of process mining such as prediction, recommendation, and trend analysis. The challenge is to turn torrents of event data ("Big Data") into valuable insights related to performance and compliance. The results can be used to identify and understand bottlenecks, inefficiencies, deviations, and risks. Process mining helps organizations to "mine their own business": they are enabled to discover, monitor and improve real processes by extracting knowledge from event logs. In his talk, prof. Wil van der Aalst will provide an overview of this exciting field that will become more and more important for BPM.

Short biography:
Prof.dr.ir. Wil van der Aalst is a full professor of Information Systems at the Technische Universiteit Eindhoven (TU/e). He is also the Academic Supervisor of the International Laboratory of Process-Aware Information Systems of the National Research University, Higher School of Economics in Moscow. Moreover, since 2003 he has a part-time appointment at Queensland University of Technology (QUT). His research interests include workflow management, process mining, Petri nets, business process management, process modeling, and process analysis. Many of his papers are highly cited (he has an H-index of more than 107 according to Google Scholar, making him the European computer scientist with the highest H-index) and his ideas have influenced researchers, software developers, and standardization committees working on process support. In 2012, he received the degree of doctor honoris causa from Hasselt University. In 2013, he was appointed as Distinguished University Professor of TU/e. He is also a member of the Royal Holland Society of Sciences and Humanities (Koninklijke Hollandsche Maatschappij der Wetenschappen) and the Academy of Europe (Academia Europaea).